Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies

This Friday: "Labor Cases Before the European Court of Human Rights"

Labor Studies Workshare Series

Join the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies for our final Labor Studies Workshare of the year. Filiz Kahraman, a PhD student in the UW Department of Political Science - and the Bridges Center's Program Assistant! - will be discussing her paper, "Re-Stating Workers' Human Rights: Labor Cases Before the European Court of Human Rights."

Kahraman's paper explores the mobilization of human rights law by labor activists in the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). At a time when labor activists have abandoned socialistic ideals and welfare states are declining in Europe, the ECtHR has emerged as one of the few institutional sites towards which organized labor can mobilize.

The workshare will occur this Friday, May 26 from 12:00pm to 1:30pm in Smith Hall, room 306, on the UW Seattle campus. It is not too late to RSVP, but please do so soon. Participants are asked to read Filiz's paper in advance in order to inform discussion and feedback. | RSVP Now


Next Week: Workshop to Discuss "Protecting Faculty Rights in the New Era"

The new political era in the United States is filled with uncertainty and anxiety for broad swaths of American society. For faculty, this ranges from concerns about our own and our students ability to travel freely, safety to speak our minds without harassment in the classroom and online, and guarantees of academic freedom, among many other things. Faculty of color, non-US citizens, and contingent faculty feel these things most acutely.

UW Faculty Forward invites you to a panel discussion discussing these issues on Thursday, June 1 from 4:00pm to 6:00pm in Smith Hall, Room 105. The event will feature stories and Q&A from UW faculty members and other academics affected by and working on these issues, discussing strategies for addressing them. | RSVP Now


Now Seeking Applications for Labor Studies Scholarships and Grants

Deadline to Apply: Monday, June 12

Are you an undergrad passionate about social justice? A graduate student writing a dissertation on a labor-related topic? A faculty member conducting research on a labor issue in Washington State?

You are in luck! Each year, the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies awards over $50,000 in scholarships and grants to students and faculty at the University of Washington. The Bridges Center is currently seeking applicants from all three UW campuses and from students at all stages of education and experience. | Read More


UW Labor Studies Courses for Summer and Autumn 2017

Register Now!

In Summer and Autumn 2017, over twenty-five Labor Studies-related courses will be offered at UW Seattle and UW Tacoma.

All courses listed count towards a Minor in Labor Studies, including HISTCMP 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies, a foundational course for the Minor.

For a full listing complete with course details, click here for a PDF, or visit the Labor Studies Minor website.

Autumn 2017 registration began Friday, May 5 and continues through the summer. Plan now and register early!


BRIDGES CENTER EVENTS


Friday, May 26

Labor Studies Workshare: Re-Stating Workers' Human Rights: Labor Cases Before the European Court of Human Rights

Filiz Kahraman, UW Political Science

12:00pm-1:30pm. Smith Hall, Room 306, UW Seattle. Cookies and coffee provided. RSVP required.

Abstract: In recent years, labor activists are increasingly mobilizing human rights law to draw attention to precarious working conditions and restrictions on labor activism. In Europe, this trend has been marked by pro-worker judgments of the European Court of Human Rights on labor cases (ECtHR). Despite the increased number and significance of this case law, the growing case law at the ECtHR have garnered little attention from social scientists. This paper draws on an original database of labor cases brought before the ECtHR from 1960 to 2013 to analyze the legal mobilization of workers before the ECtHR. The range of labor cases—from trade union rights to workplace safety, from discrimination to privacy in the workplace—demonstrates that the ECtHR has become a new terrain for contesting labor disputes in Europe. The legal mobilization of workers has led to a significant expansion of labor rights in European human rights law, and, within the past decade, the Court has become increasingly responsive to the workers’ claims, in some cases by completely overturning its previous jurisprudence. I suggest that, at a time when labor activists have given up on their socialistic ideals and welfare states have been declining in Europe, the ECtHR has emerged as one of the few institutional sites towards which organized labor could direct mobilization efforts. The paper contextualizes the sharp turn in the ECtHR’s new approach to labor rights by identifying major political changes during this period that affected the trajectory of labor rights litigation.

Format: We will circulate the paper to the attendees a week in advance of the workshare. Participants will be expected to have read the paper before the meeting and be prepared for a discussion. Coffee and cookies will be served. Attendees encouraged to bring lunch.

RSVP: Please RSVP to kahraman@uw.edu.


Tuesday, May 30

Panel: The Marginalized Voices of the UW

6:00pm-8:00pm. Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center, Chicanx and Native Suite (second floor), UW Seattle. Light snacks and refreshments provided.

The UW Black Student Union and UW MEChA would like to invite you to come hear a panel of UW custodians talk about their struggles working at the UW.

Come learn how we as students can support their cause!

Light snacks and refreshments will be provided.

This event is sponsored by the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies at the University of Washington. For questions, please contact HBCLS@uw.edu.


Thursday, June 1

Panel and Workshop: Protecting Faculty Rights in the New Era

UW Faculty Forward

4:00pm-6:00pm. Smith Hall, Room 105, UW Seattle. Refreshments provided. RSVP requested.

The new political era in the United States is filled with uncertainty and anxiety for broad swaths of American society. For faculty, this ranges from concerns about our own and our students ability to travel freely, safety to speak our minds without harassment in the classroom and online, and guarantees of academic freedom, among many other things. Faculty of color, non-US citizens, and contingent faculty feel these things most acutely. There are some university resources available to address these issues, but they aren’t applied consistently or equally between faculty.

Faculty Forward invites you to a panel discussion about these issues, followed by a clinic from the Electronic Frontier Foundation on digital privacy and rights. The panel will feature stories and Q&A from UW faculty members and other academics affected by and working on these issues, discussing strategies for addressing them. The clinic will offer an overview of the digital harassment landscape, then offer tools on how to best protect your online presence, security and anonymity.


Thursday, June 22 - Sunday, June 25

Conference: Scales of Struggle: Communities, Movements, and Global Connections

Labor and Working Class History Association

Times vary. Mary Gates Hall, UW Seattle. Registration required; $100 (includes two lunches); or reduced rate: $60 (students, K-12 or adjunct faculty; include two lunches).

Volunteers attend free! Volunteers are needed for all three days of the conference to assist with registration, set-up, and more. Volunteers receive free registration, including lunch. If interested, please contact Andrew Hedden of the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies at heddena@uw.edu or call (206) 543-7946.

Registration is now open. It has been almost a decade since the Labor and Working Class History Association (LAWCHA) has met on the West Coast. The Scales of Struggle conference brings together more than 300 scholars, teachers, labor educators, and activists for three days of presentations, films, and discussion of class, labor, race, rights, and struggles of working people now and in the past, here and around the world. Never has it been more important that we address the challenges of activism and learn from the successes and failures of other times and places.

The program features five plenary panels and more than 90 concurrent sessions including five new documentary films.

Brief Schedule Overview

Thursday, June 22
  • 5:30-6:30 Welcome reception
  • 6:30-8:00 “Mass Incarceration and the Working Class” plenary with Heather Ann Thompson, Donna Murch, Kelly Lytle Hernandez, Julie Greene
Friday, June 23
  • 8:30-11:45 Concurrent sessions (papers, roundtables, films)
  • 12:00-1:45 Lunch and plenary: “The New Global Working Class and the Fight for Labor Rights” with Annelise Orleck and Marcel Van Der Linden 2:00-5:30 Concurrent sessions 7:30-9:00 Public session: Julia Reichert’s forthcoming film about the 9 to 5 movement and the origins of SEIU 925
Saturday, June 24
  • 8:30-10:00 “Thinking Globally, Resisting Locally: What Can Labor Learn from Seattle and Washington State?” plenary with Nicole Grant, Jeff Johnson, others
  • 10:15-11:45 Concurrent sessions
  • 12-1:45 Lunch and LAWCHA awards and members meeting
  • 2:00-5:30 Concurrent Sessions
  • 5:30-6:00 Reception and public session sponsored by Labor Archives of Washington
  • 6:00-7:30 “Past Forward: The Legacy of Left Coast Militant Unionism and Lessons For Today's Struggles” plenary with Catherine Powell, Robin Walker, Conor Casey, Rich Austin Jr., Dean McGrath, Terri Mast, Michael McCann
Sunday, June 25
  • 8:30-11:45 Concurrent Sessions

LAWCHA is an international organization of scholars, teachers, students, labor educators and activists. Hosted by the Harry Bridges Center of Labor Studies, the Seattle meeting provides a chance to visit a city where labor has been winning important victories and pioneering new strategies. | View the Program and Register


Saturday, June 24

Labor Archives of Washington: Past Forward: The Legacy of Left Coast Militant Unionism and Lessons For Today’s Struggles

5:30pm reception; 6:00-7:30pm program. Mary Gates Hall, UW Seattle. Free and open to the public. Food and drinks provided. Free parking on campus. RSVP requested.

The Labor Archives of Washington and the and Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies at University of Washington invite all to mark their calendars for a special event, “Past Forward: The Legacy of Left Coast Militant Unionism and Lessons For Today’s Struggles.” It will be 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 24 at Mary Gates Hall, University of Washington Seattle Campus.

It will be an evening devoted to the dramatic and powerful labor history of the West Coast waterfront, the importance of preserving that history, and the inspiration it can provide us in our present political moment. This three-part program features segments with labor archivists, ILWU activists, and political scientists putting the history and present into perspective.

Part 1: Labor Archives History Panel

“Under the Hook, in the Hall, on the March, and upon the Shelves: ILWU-Related Collections at Pacific Coast Labor Archives”

Presenters:

  • Robin Walker, Librarian and Archivist, ILWU Library and Archives
  • Catherine Powell, Director, Labor Archives and Research Center, SFSU
  • Conor Casey, Labor Archivist/Director, Labor Archives of Washington, UW

In this panel, labor archivists will talk about the ILWU’s rich and often colorful history preserved in archives in California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii. Featuring the directors of three labor archives — the Labor Archives and Research Center at San Francisco State University, the Labor Archives of Washington at the University of Washington, Seattle; and the Anne Rand Library at the International Longshore and Warehouse Union in San Francisco — this panel will discuss the ways in which unions, universities, scholars, and activists have worked together to preserve and promote the legacy of the left coast maritime labor movement. The presentations will highlight collections from this history, which relate directly to today’s struggles for workers’ rights, immigrant rights, social justice, civil rights, and other causes. Topics will include the Harry Bridges Deportation trials, the deportation and defense of progressive Filipino American cannery union officers and members, and other episodes in the union’s long history of activism.

Part 2: ILWU Activists Panel

“How History Informs Current Struggles”

Presenters:

  • Rich Austin, Jr., President of ILWU, Local 19
  • Dean McGrath, President of ILWU , Local 23
  • Terri Mast, National Secretary Treasurer Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific
  • George Lovell, Harry Bridges Center Chair (Moderator)

ILWU officers consider how the militant history and guiding principles of the union relate directly to today’s struggles and how those lessons can help suggest a path for current and future efforts.

Part 3: “The Legacy of ILWU Activism in the Current Political Context”

  • Michael McCann, Harry Bridges Center Director

Professor of Political Science and Harry Bridges Center Director Michael McCann will consider the history of the ILWU and social justice unionism on the Pacific Coast with issues such as immigration, civil rights, and social justice history and current struggles within the current political context. What lessons from the ILWU’s history inform current can and future actions?


EVENTS OF INTEREST


Tuesday, May 23

Forum: The Red Square Shooting on Inauguration Day

UW American Association of University Professors

4:00pm-6:00pm. Kane Hall, Room 110, UW Seattle.

On January 20, Inauguration Day, self-described anti-fascist activist Josh Dukes was shot and critically injured at a rally at the University of Washington. Milo Yiannopoulos, a high-profile “alt-right” (white supremacist) speaker, had been invited by the College Republicans to speak at Kane Hall on that evening. Hundreds of people opposed to the speaker and his message had rallied outside Kane Hall, where those attending the talk were queued up to enter the hall. Both the UW and the Seattle police were there in force.

In the aftermath of the shooting, information about the incident and the shooter was scarce, and often contradictory. It was reported that someone had turned himself in, but this person was released. Rumors abounded about whether the shooter was a UW student, about whether police had purposefully corralled people from opposing sides in order to create an incident to facilitate arrests, and about whether the shooters were affiliated with individuals who had placed threatening neo-Nazi-style posters on the campus. No arrests were made, and no explanation for the lack of arrests was given. Police and UW administration declined to comment, citing the ongoing investigation as the reason.

Woven through the conversations about the incident are concerns about hosting a speaker that some in the university community consider an advocate of hate. Is “hate speech” protected “free speech?” What is “hate speech,” and should it be banned from college campuses? This issue is being raised not just the University of Washington campuses, but at campuses around the country.

The University of Washington American Association of University Professors (AAUP-UW) will host a forum to air these issues on Tuesday, May 23 at Kane Hall, from 4 6 p.m. “What did we learn from the Milo Yiannopoulos event on Inauguration Day? And what would we do differently next time?” The event features a panel of speakers representing a range of perspectives. Confirmed speakers include Shon Meckfessel, faculty member at Highline Community College and author of the book, “Nonviolence Ain’t What it Used to Be;” Ana Sofia Knauf, reporter for the Seattle Stranger, which led in regional coverage of the event; John Walker, a member of the Industrial Workers of the World who will speak for the shooting victim; and Venkat Balasubramani, of the ACLU. Students on the panel include Jack Pickett, representing the UW College Republicans; Alan-Michael Weatherford, doctoral student in history at UW; and Ruby Byrne, UW physics doctoral student. Abraham Flaxman, UW faculty member and AAUP vice-president, will moderate the discussion. Representatives of UW administration and the UW police department were invited but declined to attend, as did the attorney for the Hokoanas, the couple who have now been indicted in the shooting. The event is free and open to the public.


NEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS


BRIDGES CENTER SCHOLARSHIPS & GRANTS


2017-2018 Silme Domingo & Gene Viernes Scholarship

$5,500 scholarship for graduate students or undergraduates entering or transferring into the University of Washington

Deadline to apply: Monday, May 29, 2017

The Domingo-Viernes Scholarship annually provides $5,500 in financial support to graduate students or undergraduate students entering or transferring into the University of Washington who are committed to the principles of justice and equality and have demonstrated financial need.

Founded through the efforts of the Inlandboatmen's Union, Region 37, this scholarship honors Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two inspiring leaders of the Seattle labor movement.

For more information, visit the Bridges Center website or contact Associate Director Andrew Hedden at hbcls@uw.edu.


2017-2018 Scholarships & Prizes

Over $35,000 to be awarded to graduate and undergraduate students in Labor Studies

Deadline to apply: Monday, June 12, 2017

Each year, the Bridges Center awards thousands of dollars to top students in Labor Studies.

This year's awards include:

For more information, visit the Bridges Center website or contact Associate Director Andrew Hedden at hbcls@uw.edu.


2017-2018 Washington State Labor Research Grant

Research grants available to UW graduate students and faculty

Deadline to apply: Monday, June 12, 2017

The Bridges Center supports ground-breaking labor studies research through our annual grant funding program. For a look at past sponsored projects, visit our Featured Research website.

The Washington State Labor Research Grant program makes funding up to $10,000 available to University of Washington faculty for policy-oriented research on aspects of labor directly relevant to policy makers in Washington State. UW graduate students may also apply if their project is sponsored by a faculty member. Funding includes a tuition waiver for graduate employees.

For more information, visit the Bridges Center website or contact Associate Director Andrew Hedden at hbcls@uw.edu.


FACULTY IN THE NEWS


Margaret O'Mara quoted on "The epic and bizarre first 110 days of the Trump presidency" (Washington Post)

***UW History Professor Margaret O'Mara serves on the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies Standing Committee***

Veterans of political Washington repeatedly have asked themselves: “Did that really happen?” Scholars of the presidency say there’s no precedent for what they are seeing.

“The presidential comps (‘Trump is like __’) are starting to run out of steam, if they had any to begin with, because of the a) consistent departure from norms and b) the fact that it is all moving at hyperspeed,” historian Margaret O’Mara of the University of Washington told The Washington Post by email Wednesday morning. | Read More


Opposition Art: Bonfire Gallery show features anti-Trump art (Real Change)

***UW Tacoma Professor Beverly Naidus is a Faculty Associate of the Harry Bridges Center***

In the back corner of the room is “AND NOW Behind Curtain #45” by artist and UW Tacoma professor Beverly Naidus. The mixed media installation includes a portrait of a woman wearing a blindfold with a barcode in the center. The phrase “what’s good for big business is good for America” is along the bottom. The night of the election, Naidus said she was physically disturbed.

“The signs were there for this to happen. I was hoping that it wouldn’t happen,” Naidus said. “The useful thing for me is that a lot of people have awakened from denial, and my students are ready to take on the label of activist for the first time since I’ve been there.” | Read More


‘My Family’s Slave’ A UW professor weighs in (Crosscut)

***UW History Professor Vicente Rafael is a Faculty Associate of the Harry Bridges Center***

Earlier this week, The Atlantic published an astonishing cover story, My Family’s Slave, about a Seattle family’s secret servant, a Filipina named Eudocia Tomas Pulido. (She was called “Lola.”) “She was 18 years old when my grandfather gave her to my mother as a gift, and when my family moved to the United States, we brought her with us. No other word but slave encompassed the life she lived,” wrote the late journalist Alex Tizon.

Tizon, who died in March, was a longtime reporter at The Seattle Times in the 1980s and ’90s, and he won a Pulitzer Prize. His Atlantic story, which has gone viral, has been appreciated as a brutal and gutsy story about a son trying to make amends for the sins of his parents. And it’s also been excoriated for romanticizing an abhorrent truth and for the author’s failure in fully grasping his own complicity in her suffering.

Vicente L. Rafael, a professor of Southeast Asian history at the University of Washington, shared Tizon’s story on Facebook, calling it “an amazing story about modern-day slavery in a struggling Filipino immigrant family in the U.S.”

“It makes one think of how immigrant communities can also be sites for breeding compulsory servitude which, hidden from public view, amount to slavery within the same race,” Rafael wrote. “And it suggests some uncanny resemblances to the situation of servants in middle-class homes in the Philippines as well as domestic workers overseas as well.” | Read More


LABOR NEWS ON CAMPUS


United Students Against Sweatshops pressures administration on Nike sponsorship (UW Daily)

Last Thursday, members of the United Students Against Sweatshops (USAS) rallied outside the HUB to celebrate a proposal calling upon UW president Ana Mari Cauce to reevaluate university licensing agreements with Nike.

The proposal was passed May 2 by the president’s Advisory Committee on Trademark and Licensing (ACTL) and advocated that in upcoming contract reevaluations, Nike be required to comply with inspections from the Workers Rights Consortium (WRC), an independent labor monitor, into their factory in Hansae, Vietnam.

Nearly 8,500 employees work at Nike’s Hansae factory, where a majority of their collegiate-branded material is manufactured. In 2016, the WRC and the Fair Labor Association were granted one-time access to the factory, from which they reported on severe violations in labor practices, including wage theft, forced overtime, and factory temperatures “well in excess” of the legal 90-degree limit. | Read More


INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES


Intern for Social Change: Union Summer 2017

Six week paid internship with Seattle-area labor organizations

Are you or anyone you know interested in working for social change? Union Summer is a paid ($15/hour) summer internship program for people interested in getting involved in the labor movement.

Union Summer participants will spend six weeks, from June 20 to July 29, working full-time and hands-on with different campaigns - talking to the community, marching for justice, and gaining first-hand experience in the movement. The positions are based in and around Seattle, but campaigns may take place throughout the region.

Questions? Contact the Harry Bridges Center at hbcls@uw.edu or call (206) 543-7946. | Apply Now


May 22, 2017


IN THIS ISSUE


Bridges Center Events

  • Fri, May 26
    Labor Studies Workshare: "Labor Cases Before the European Court of Human Rights"

  • Tues, May 30
    Panel: The Marginalized Voices of the UW

  • Thurs, June 1
    Protecting Faculty Rights in the New Era

  • June 22 - June 25
    2017 Labor and Working Class History Association Conference

  • Sat, June 24
    Past Forward: The Legacy of Left Coast Militant Unionism and Lessons For Today’s Struggles

Events of Interest

News & Announcements

Support the Bridges Center




LABOR RESEARCH

REPORT OF THE MONTH

2017-2018 Washington State Labor Research Grants

No "Report of the Month" this month, just a reminder to UW graduate students and faculty to apply for our upcoming 2017-2018 Washington State Labor Research Grants!

Each year, the Bridges Center funds labor research across many disciplines. Up to $10,000 is available. The deadlines to apply is June 12, 2017.




ON-LINE RESOURCES

PROJECT OF THE MONTH

The Industrial Workers of the World History Project

Thanks to this recent project, explore the history of the IWW through databases of hundreds of strikes, campaigns, arrests, and other incidents, as well as a wealth of photographs and documents.




LABOR ARCHIVES

COLLECTION OF THE MONTH

Samuel B. Bassett Papers

Each year, the Bridges Center awards a scholarship in honor of Samuel Bassett (1896-1971), a Seattle area labor leader represented the IWW, Teamsters locals, civil liberties cases, and more.




SUPPORT THE CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES

Support the Bridges Center

Please support the work of the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies.

Donations can be made to the Bridges Center on-line securely with a credit card, or with a check by downloading our donation form. All gifts are tax-deductible.

For more information, click here, or call us at 206-543-7946.


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