Simpson Center for the Humanities

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Weekly Events + Announcements for March 6 - 17, 2013
This list of events and announcements is provided as a service by the University of Washington Simpson Center for the Humanities. Events and times are subject to change.

 

Announcements

Events Today

Events This Week

Events Next Week

For more details or to submit an event, visit our web calendar.
 
--------------------
 

 ANNOUNCEMENTS

 ANNOUNCEMENT
Rock the Archive: Women Who Rock’s 2013 (un)Conference & Film Festival Launches Digital Oral History Archive

The Women Who Rock Project documents women's creative contributions to music scenes that anchor social justice movements. This year, Women Who Rock launches the UW Women Who Rock Oral History Archive: free and publicly accessible, it preserves the stories of women who have built community through the making of music and media. To celebrate, Women Who Rock hosts a symposium on Mar. 8 at 4:00 pm in Communications 120. Scholars, librarians, and web designers will explore how feminist archiving can reshape popular music and media studies. The dialogue continues throughout on Mar. 9, with the Women Who Rock 2013 (un)Conference & Film Festival at Historic Washington Hall. All events are free and open to the public. Learn more here.


 ANNOUNCEMENT
Cathy Davidson’s Winter Katz Lecture Now Available Via Podcast!

Did you miss Cathy Davidson’s Katz Lecture last month? Well, no worries! We’ve just posted her full lecture via podcast on the newly redesigned Media & Publications section of our website. Listen to her talk, plus more than twenty-five other past Katz Lectures at our remodeled Podcasts page.


 Spring 2013 Course Annoucement
Who Knows What and Why that Matters: Activism, Collaboration and Struggle in the Global South
Deadline - Friday, Mar 29, 2013

Working for social change most anywhere in the world, and especially in the Global South, necessitates a complex dance between varying and conflicting actors, agents, and agendas. We know there are politics associated with who knows what and how, and this seminar provides an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the transnational and global forces at play. Add code required. Students wishing to participate should address a 1-2 paragraph statement of interest to Anu Taranath, by or before March 29, 2013. Course details available here.


 EVENTS
 Lecture
Speaking Soviet with an Accent: Crafting Culture in Kyrgyzstan
Thompson 317 - Wednesday, Mar 6, 2013 - 1:30 PM

Ali Igmen (History, California State University, Long Beach) talks about his recent book, his sources, inspiration, and conclusions with specific examples that illustrate the construction of "modern" Soviet identities in Kyrgyz Houses of Culture, Kyrgyz Theater, and Stalinist Festivals in Kyrgyzstan.
 Graduate Interest Group
Medieval Studies Graduate Interest Reading Group: Tolkien
Communications 226 - Wednesday, Mar 6, 2013 - 4:30 PM

For our winter quarter reading group meeting, the Medieval Studies Graduate Interest Group will be looking at a selection of Tolkien, paired with a medieval Welsh Text. The articles can be found on the Medieval Studies GIG website.
 Graduate Interest Group
pelo LAB 2010: Community-Based Design in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil
Gould 110 - Wednesday, Mar 6, 2013 - 6:00 PM  Details

Join the Critical Design GIG for a talk by Juca De Oliveira, who is sharing his work on an innovative year-long project on community-based design in the working class neighborhoods of Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. pelo LAB is the resulting project of a year's work done by a group of Architecture & Urban Planning students in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil from March to December, 2010.
 Lecture
Computing for Social Justice and Sustainability
Kane 120 - Wednesday, Mar 6, 2013 - 6:30 PM  Details

Computational sciences provide us with a powerful array of technologies for visualization, simulation, and analysis. But their power is more often at the service of military and industry than the visions of Gandhi or Martin Luther King, Jr. From complexity theory and nanotechnology to DIY sensors and crowdsourcing, Ron Eglash (Science & Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) discusses exciting possibilities for not only applying computing to problems in social justice and sustainability, but using those challenges as drivers for new innovation and research. Register to attend here.
 Other
Diversity, Equity, and Access in STEM Fields: A Conversation
HUB 334 - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 10:00 AM  Details

Join GO-MAP and the Simpson Center for conversation with Ron Eglash (Science & Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute). A cyberneticist specializing in ethnomathematics, Eglash studies the relationship between math and culture, and its implications for social justice and sustainability. His recently published article, "Race, Sex, and Nerds," looks at the socio-cultural norms and barriers that shape participation in STEM fields, and some strategies for challenging them. To register for this event, please RSVP here. Eglash will give the GO-MAP/Graduate School lecture the evening before, Wednesday, March 6, at 6:30 pm in Kane Hall, room 120. Click here for more information, and to register to attend the lecture.
 Lecture
Nobuko Miyamoto in Conversation with Gail Nomura: Art and Social Change
EXED 110 (Boeing Auditorium) - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 10:30 AM  Details

Women Who Rock 2013's featured speaker, Nobuko Miyamoto, founded Great Leap, an arts organization that has been at the forefront of creating a cultural voice for Asian Americans since 1978. Miyamoto discusses her recent works focused on climate change, where she has been recognized with the Ford Foundation’s Leadership for a Changing World Award and a California Arts Council Director’s Award for her contribution to the arts and social change. Moderated by Gail Nomura (American Ethnic Studies).
 Other
Certificate in Public Scholarship Information Session for Prospective Fellows and Faculty
Communications 206 - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 3:00 PM  Details

The Certificate in Public Scholarship enables graduate students to integrate their intellectual, political, and professional interests through engagement with diverse publics. The Certificate’s students, faculty, and community partners generate new forms of culture, knowledge, and expression; re-envision the ends and means of higher education; and open professional pathways inside and outside the academy. The Certificate's curriculum and crossdisciplinary advising network supports fellows in a self-directed course of study shaped to their personal and professional goals. Applications due April 17, 2013. Coursework begins autumn 2013. Graduate students of good standing in any program at the University of Washington are eligible to apply. Learn more about the Certificate in Public Scholarship by attending one of the following information sessions. RSVP requested via Catalyst.
 Graduate Interest Group
The Postcolonial State, Cold War, and Diaspora Politics
Communications 226 - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 3:30 PM

Jaeeun Kim (Postdoctoral Fellow, Walter H Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University) discusses the postcolonial state, Cold War, and diaspora politics. Kim will be an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at George Mason University, beginning fall 2013. Sponsored by the Asian American Studies Research Collective Graduate Interest Group.
 Colloquium
Ethics from the Bottom-Up: Recursive Depth in Technosocial Networks
Communications 202 - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 4:00 PM  Details

Ron Eglash (Science & Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) discusses how bottom-up social networks mediated by technology are changing the political, economic, and cultural landscape. Eglash argues that not all bottom-up networks are equally democratizing: while Open Source and DIY empower their publics by increasing generative capacity, systems like Facebook offer only a shallow facade of exchange. Leveraging concepts from complexity theory, "recursive depth" offers a framework for assessing the ethics of bottom-up social networks,” including those of the social scientist doing the assessment. Part of the Biological Futures in a Globalized World colloquium series.
 Other
UW/NAAM Student Showcase
Legacy Gallery, Northwest African American Museum - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 5:00 PM  Details

Certificate in Public Scholarship Fellows Maurice Dolbery (Education) and Melanie Hernandez (English) worked with their practicum-portfolio advisor Professor Ralina Joseph (Communication), UW undergraduates taking Black Cultural Studies, and the Northwest African American Museum on museum-based collaboration projects this quarter. Come see what they did! Projects include education story trunks, exhibitions on health, collections research, and public relations. For more on the collaboration, read the news story.
 Film Screening
Antiquity in Silent Film: A Film Screening
Kane 210 - Thursday, Mar 7, 2013 - 7:00 PM  Details

A screening of six silent films on Classical subjects, with live piano accompaniment by Eunhyo Woo. The films will be introduced by Maria Wyke (University College, London), and include La Légende de Midas (Louis Feuillade, 1910), La Caduta di Troia (Giovanni Pastrone and Romano Luigi Borgnetto, 1910), and The Private Life of Helen of Troy (Alexander Korda, 1927).
 Lecture
Vernacular Islam in Medieval Iran and Anatolia
Gowen 201 - Friday, Mar 8, 2013 - 2:30 PM  Details

In this lecture, Ahmet Karamustafa (History, University of Maryland) will take stock of the existing scholarship on the topic of quotidian religiosity among Persian and Turkish speakers, assess the significance of the relevant historical sources for the study of this topic, and point the way forward for researchers working on "vernacular Islam."
 Lecture
Antiquity and Silent Cinema
Thomson 125 - Friday, Mar 8, 2013 - 3:30 PM  Details

Maria Wyke (University College London) will present the 2012-2013 John and Mary McDiarmid Lecture. Wyke is currently editing a collection of essays titled The Ancient World in Silent Cinema, which explores early cinema's fascination with the past and the appeal of ancient civilizations in modernity.
 Symposium
Rock the Archive: The Politics of Collective Digital Archives
Communications 120 - Friday, Mar 8, 2013 - 4:00 PM  Details

Rock the Archive: The Politics of Collective Digital Archives Symposium marks the launch of the Women Who Rock Digital Oral History Archive. Hosted by the UW Libraries, the archive preserves the oral histories of a racially diverse array of women from the U.S., Mexico, and beyond who have made significant contributions to music scenes, social justice movements, public scholarship, and community life. Structured as a roundtable, the symposium will feature scholars, librarians, and web designers who will explore how the inclusion of these women and their stories demands new forms of feminist archiving and meta-data praxis and new paradigms for popular music studies and new media studies. In conjunction with the 2013 Women Who Rock (Un)Conference and Film Festival.
 Film Screening
Women Who Rock (Un)Conference & Film Festival
Historic Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave - Saturday, Mar 9, 2013 - 12:00 PM  Details

The third annual Women Who Rock (Un)Conference celebrates the launch of the UW Women Who Rock Oral History Archive. Women Who Rock responds to the ways women's participation in independent music scenes has often been downplayed or unacknowledged. The Women Who Rock Oral History Archive preserves the stories of women who have built community through the making of music and media in Seattle, the Pacific Northwest and beyond. At 3:00 pm, the “Rock the Archive” Film Festival highlights films by and about women and organizations across a variety of musical genres featured in the archive, which is on-line and free to the public. Full program and details at Women Who Rock website. Register for the (un)Conference.
 Lecture
Do the Stars in Heaven Speak?
Kane 210 - Saturday, Mar 9, 2013 - 7:00 PM  Details

The lecture by Fatemeh Keshavarz (Roshan Center, University of Maryland) will explore classical Persian poetry, not as an exotic work of art, but as a creative mode of engaging life's daily challenges. Using examples from Rumi's dynamic and down to earth poetry, the lecture presents his work as an imaginative struggle with simple questions of life while emphasizing the ideal of listening to one's inner voice. This promise of infusing the daily strife with deeper meaning is at the heart of Rumi's popularity in the 21st century.
 Lecture
Not the Whole Story(ville): New Orleans Jazzwmen as New Jazz Studies
Music 219 - Monday, Mar 11, 2013 - 11:30 AM

Sherrie Tucker (American Studies, University of Kansas) is the author of Swing Shift: 'All-Girl' Bands of the 1940s and co-editor, with Nichole T. Rustin, of Big Ears: Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies. As with other fields in which women have been largely omitted from historical memory and gender taken for granted, jazz has often been remembered, represented, and historicized as a sequence of male innovators. From “all-girl” swing bands to early New Orleans bands to women brass players, Tucker has revisited and researched many jazz histories, representations, and performances, using theories from gender studies, intersectional analysis of race, gender, class, sexuality, nation and tools from women's history to illuminate perspectives inclusive of gender and women. Tucker shares some useful research strategies that are widely applicable to other fields where considerations of gender and women have been marginalized.
 Panel Discussion
Following the Fulbright: A Conversation
Architecture 110 - Monday, Mar 11, 2013 - 12:00 PM

This discussion will focus on the legacies of the Fulbright fellowship in regard to the understanding of Japan and its broader impact in the US. Richard Haag, landscape architect of Gas Works Park and the Bloedel Reserve, was a Fulbright fellow to Japan (1954-55) and Samuel Shepherd directed the Tokyo-based Japan-United States Educational Commission (Fulbright, 1994-2004). Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies program and the College of Built Environments.
 Lecture
The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Digital Humanists
Denny 308 - Tuesday, Mar 12, 2013 - 4:00 PM  Details

In this lecture, Todd Presner (Germanic Languages, Comparative Literature, and Jewish Studies, University of California, Los Angeles) discusses the seven habits of highly effective digital humanists. In an age of instantaneous information access, endless social networking, data deluge, and incessant innovation, what's left of the core practices and values of the Humanities, which have traditionally privileged reflective contemplation, books and reading, the search for meaning, and informed cultural critique? What happens to the Humanities when confronted with the possibilities of the digital information age, and what happens to the digital information age when confronted with the millennia-long history of the Humanities? Referencing the famous management book that seeks to distill key leadership qualities for success in the business world, this talk argues for the centrality of the Humanities for critical digital thought and innovation.
 Other
Certificate in Public Scholarship Information Session for Prospective Fellows and Faculty
Communications 206 - Wednesday, Mar 13, 2013 - 4:00 PM  Details

The Certificate in Public Scholarship enables graduate students to integrate their intellectual, political, and professional interests through engagement with diverse publics. The Certificate’s students, faculty, and community partners generate new forms of culture, knowledge, and expression; re-envision the ends and means of higher education; and open professional pathways inside and outside the academy. The Certificate's curriculum and crossdisciplinary advising network supports fellows in a self-directed course of study shaped to their personal and professional goals. Applications due April 17, 2013. Coursework begins autumn 2013. Graduate students of good standing in any program at the University of Washington are eligible to apply. Learn more about the Certificate in Public Scholarship by attending one of the following information sessions. RSVP requested via Catalyst.
 Performance
Teatro Para Una Crisis/Four Acts for a Crisis
Hutchinson 205 - Thursday, Mar 14, 2013 - 7:30 PM  Details

Four one-act plays presented in Spanish by students from the Division of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, dealing with the rifts and barriers we build between each other through social, economic and cultural divisions.The plays: Memoria fotográfica, by Beth Escudé, Historia de un flemón, by Osvaldo Dragún, El censo, by Emilio Carballido, and El delantal blanco, by Sergio Vodanovic.
 Lecture
A Japanese Manga Artist in Occupied Indonesia: Ono Saseo and Modern Painting in East Asia
Communications 206 - Friday, Mar 15, 2013 - 5:00 PM  Details

Ono Saseo, a propaganda painter in occupied Indonesia 1942-1946, is one of the most frequently referenced figures in discussions of World War II Japanese propaganda, associated with the rise of racial stereotypes in cartoon-style manga drawing. This study challenges this general understanding of Ono and re-examines his work by focusing on the following three ways that we may understand the diversity of his production. These three points help reveal the paradoxical motives and multiple-significance of Ono’s manga works in the wartime period. Adachi Gen (Joshibi University of Art and Design, Japan) is an art historian who has written on modern Japanese avant-garde art and manga. He is currently a Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship for Young Scientists of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (2010-2013) and is an adjunct lecturer at Joshibi University of Art and Design. More details on the lecture flyer.

Manage Your Subscriptions or Unsubscribe